My debut with The National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia and Azultrabuco!

Last month saw my first visit to South America, a tour which had long excited me as I have always harboured a keen desire to see that part of the world. Colombia, Bogota specifically, was a wonderful place to make that arrival. My work was with The National Symphony Orchstra of Colombia, one of the most exciting ensembles I have ever played with. There was a true sense of occasion to the project I was involved with, which daringly presented Jennifer Higdon’s “Percussion Concerto” to an audience largely unfamiliar with contemporary music. The media really picked up on the event though, and I was kept busy with numerous television and radio interviews, whilst flattered by a whole page in El Pais! Struggling earlier in the season to get 1/3rd attendance for certain classics of the repertoire, we were thrilled to sell the concert out and I was overjoyed with the reception the work received. Further amusement and satisfaction came at the interval when I sold out of the 50 Cds I brought with me to “maybe” sell – Colombia has numerous new Dave Maric fans now!!

After the concert I was invited by one of the bass players to join his band Azultrabuco and have a shot on the timbales!! Now, timbales are truly one of the great percussion instruments, and I have always wanted to play them in a salsa band of any ilk, so to get that chance “Live in Bogota” was one of my life’s most exciting moments. The guys in the band were brilliant at keeping me right and very generous to allow me to be part of their amazing music. So infectious and so brilliant – please preserve me from every hearing the generic dull throb of bland pop music ever again, which seems to be everywhere now, but gorgeously absent in places like Bogota.

The city itself was a spectacular place to visit, with terrific, humble and energetic people, amazing culture, and delicious food and fruit juices at every corner. A career highlight on every level. Thanks to all…

Colin.

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